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Showing 4 posts in Election.

NLRB Unsuccessfully Challenges Court’s Invalidation of “Ambush Election Rule”

As many employers may recall, the Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America (“Chamber”) filed suit against the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) earlier this year in an effort to invalidate the “ambush election rule.” Essentially, the Chamber sought to invalidate the rule which it claimed would make responding to union campaigns more difficult for employers. The Chamber argued that the rule imposes drastic changes to the procedures for conducting workplace elections, which in turn deprives employers of a fair opportunity to explain the consequences of unionizing to its employees. More ›

National Labor Relations Board Issues new Rules Designed to Speed up Union Elections

On December 21, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued final amendments to the procedures governing union representation elections. These amendments become effective on April 30, 2012. Employer groups have asserted that the changes allow unions to “ambush” businesses with union elections and force employees to make quick, uninformed decisions about whether to unionize. Union advocates, on the other hand, claim that the amendments will prevent unnecessary litigation and remove what they believe to be unnecessary delays in effectuating an “employee’s free choice” to unionize. More ›

National Labor Relations Board Issues Final Rules on “Quickie” Union Elections

On December 22, 2011, The National Labor Relations Board (the “Board”) is set to publish final amendments to the procedures for union representation elections. These final amendments ( “Amendments”) follow a heated debate with opponents claiming that the changes allow unions to “ambush” employers with union elections and force employees to make quick, uninformed decisions about whether to unionize. Proponents, on the other hand, hailed the Amendments as an effort to end unnecessary litigation and remove unnecessary delays in effectuating an employee’s free choice. Prior to the Amendments, employees have had at least thirty-two (32) days to consider union representation after an election petition is filed. With the Amendments, the regional director has complete authority to set the time-frame for an election, allowing for an election to occur in as little as ten (10) days after an election petition is filed. More ›

NLRB Issues new rules Affecting Elections

On November 30, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) decided, by a 2-1 vote, to revise several sections of its Rules & Regulations in an attempt to expedite the election process. The NLRB majority stated that their interest was to end what they referred to as unnecessary litigation. A summary of the changes are as follows:  (1) hearing officers can limit the evidence introduced at pre-election hearings to the issue of whether an election should be held; (2) hearing officers can limit the filing of briefs; (3) appeals of a hearing officer’s decisions will be heard after the election is conducted; (4) elections will not be delayed pending an appeal; (5) requests for special permission to appeal will only be granted in extraordinary circumstances; and (6) the NLRB would have discretion on which appeals to hear. Although these rules are not as favorable to union organizing efforts as the Employee Free Choice Act or the initially proposed rule changes, non-union employers should be vigilant because unions have recently demonstrated increased organizing activities.