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Showing 6 posts in Equal Pay Act.

Massachusetts Passes Radical Equal Pay Law

On August 1, 2016, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed An Act to Establish Pay Equity, which as the name aptly suggests, seeks to ensure equal pay for comparable work for all Massachusetts workers and equal opportunity to earn competitive salaries. The Act will take effect on January 1, 2018.

The new law prohibits any wage disparity between genders for “comparable work.” The statute defines “comparable work” as “work that is substantially similar in that it requires substantially similar skill, effort and responsibility, and is performed under similar working conditions; provided, however, that a job title or job description alone shall not determine comparability.” More ›

DOL Updates Federal Contractor Regulations Prohibiting Sex Discrimination for First Time Since 1970

On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Labor announced a final rule to expand sex discrimination guidelines for federal contractors and subcontractors. The final rule updates—for the first time in over 40 years—the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs' sex discrimination regulations to align them with current interpretations of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the realities of today's diverse workforce. More ›

Sixth Circuit: No Gender Bias in Wage Difference between Male and Female Counterparts

In this case, the employee began working with the auto parts manufacturer when she was a student. After she graduated, she was hired as a test engineer with the same starting salary as the other engineering graduates. More ›

Eighth Circuit: Business – Judgment Jury Instruction Is Inappropriate For Claim Under Equal Pay Act

The Eighth Circuit has issued a decision which serves as a clear reminder to employees that the federal Equal Pay Act is a strict liability statute. Basically, this means that an employer may not be able to avoid liability by simply articulating a non-discriminatory reason for its actions, as it could in a Title VII discrimination claim. Rather, when a female employee shows that she was paid less than a male employee for the same work, the employer can avoid liability under the Act only by affirmatively proving that it had a justification for the disparity in pay.  More ›

Female Manager may Proceed with pay Disparity-Gender Discrimination Claim

The concept of equal pay for equal work seems simple to understand and apply. If Jan and Joe have similar education, skills, and experience, and perform similar work, it is reasonable to assume that their pay is also the same. Unfortunately, this is not always the case, even though the Equal Pay Act has been on the books for nearly 50 years. The Seventh Circuit recently dealt with this issue in King v. Acosta Sales & Marketing, Inc.. (11-3617, Mar. 13, 2012). Plaintiff, a sales manager, performed the same duties and responsibilities as her male peers and was highly successful -- in fact, more successful than many of them, yet, her salary, both when she started and when she ended her job, was substantially lower than that of her male co-workers. The numbers were shocking disproportional, with the highest paid male sales managers often earning two to three times more than she made. More ›

Help us, Help you: EEOC asks for Input on Regulation Reforms

In a piece of beauracractic master craftsmanship, the EEOC has asked for input on possible regulatory reform by soliciting "Public Comment on Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Significant Regulations." From what we can discern from the press release, the agency is taking a serious look at stream-lining and improving the regulations covering the enforcement of six employment nondiscrimination laws: More ›

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