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Jersey City Passes paid sick Leave Legislation

Cities like San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Washington D.C., and New York City have already passed, and in many cases, implemented, laws which allow eligible employees to have paid time off of work to address illnesses or medical conditions. Jersey City, New Jersey is the latest city to pass such legislation. The new Paid Sick Time Ordinance will go into effect on January 24, 2014. Employers in the private sector who have 10 or more Jersey City employees will be required to provide eligible employees with at least one hour of paid sick leave for each thirty hours worked, up to 40 hours of maximum paid sick leave per year. Employers who have less than 10 employees aren't off the hook entirely. Those employers must still provide eligible employees with sick leave, only it can be unpaid instead of paid. Eligible employees are any full-time or part-time employees (including temporary employees) who work in Jersey City for at least 80 hours per year.

The Ordinance contains other important information for employers, and can be viewed in its entirety here.

N.J. Court Holds Remote Texter Could be Responsible for Texting Driver’s Accident

Employers - especially those who provide their employees with cell phones or who allow or permit their employees to use cell phones — should be mindful about a recent case out of New Jersey, as it has potentially far-reaching implications. More ›

New Jersey Federal Court Finds that SCA Exception Applies to Facebook Posting Shared by Co-Employee

In the case of Ehling v. Monmouth-Ocean Hospital Service Corp., Civ. No. 2:11-cv-03305 (WJM) (D. N.J. Aug. 20, 2013), a federal district court in New Jersey granted an employer's motion for summary judgment, and thereby dismissed the employee's claims of violations of the federal Stored Communications Act, (SCA"), the Family Medical Leave Act, and other claims the employee made under New Jersey law alleging discrimination, invasion of privacy, and protected "whistle blowing" activity. We will focus today on the court's analysis and application of the SCA to the sharing of screen shots from the employee's Facebook postings. Before reaching that discussion, however, the court first had to review the relevant facts.  More ›