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Showing 4 posts in Policy.

California Adds New Notice Requirement for Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking Victims

Employers, another notice provision has taken effect in California. Beginning on July 1, 2017, employers with at least 25 employees must now provide written notice to new employees that explain the rights of victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. More specifically, the required notice mandates employers notify new employees of their rights under Labor Code Sections 230 and 230.1. These sections detail the following points: More ›

Wisconsin Appellate Court Holds Management Policy Does Not Negate At-Will Employment Relationship

At-will employment is the default rule in Wisconsin. Employers may terminate for any reason or no reason at all.  However, that relationship can be overridden by contract, in some cases inadvertently, through employee policies and other post-employment agreements. In a case that came as good news for employers, last week, the Wisconsin Court of Appeals affirmed that it would not read a policy as overriding the employment at-will relationship unless the policy evidenced an intent to do so. More ›

Employer's "Super Policy" Against Harassment Requires Employer to Protect Employee Beyond that Which is Required by Law

A Costco employee suffered from Tourette's syndrome and made complaints to management about the way his supervisors and others were treating him. He later filed charges with the Connecticut Human Rights Organization as well as suit in federal district court, claiming that he was subjected to a hostile work environment and retaliation in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act and corresponding state statutes. He also claimed breach of contract and promissory estoppel.  More ›

Policy Requiring Disclosure of Nature of Illness for Work Absences may Violate ADA

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a class-action lawsuit against a department store claiming its policy violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”). The case came about when an employee was unable to attend work for a few days due to medical illness, and despite having provided a doctor’s note for her absence, the store sought the specific nature of her illness in order to have the absences deemed “excused.” The employee refused to provide the information and claimed the request was unlawful. The store subsequently terminated her employment. Later, the store revised its policies and this requirement was removed.  More ›