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San Francisco Ordinance Prohibits Employer Salary History Inquiries

Beginning July 1, 2018, it will be illegal for San Francisco employers to ask job applicants to disclose their salary history. A number of similar laws have been enacted in cities and states across the country to address the gender and minority pay gaps. More ›

Department of Labor Seeks Delay of Fiduciary Rule Implementation Until July 2019

The U.S. Department of Labor has moved to delay implementation of three exemptions of the “fiduciary rule” until July 2019. The regulation, which partially went into effect earlier this year, requires financial advisers to put retirees’ interests ahead of their own when providing investment advice regarding the customers’ retirement accounts. The provisions impacted by the delay include what is known as the “best interest contract” exemption, a requirement mandating advisers and financial institutions sign contracts agreeing to put their clients’ interests ahead of their own before servicing such clients. The best interest contract exemption would also allow investors to bring class-action lawsuits against advisers and financial firms.  The Department of Labor has sought to postpone implementation of the principal transactions exemption and amendments to the prohibited transaction exemption 84-24 as well. The exemptions were originally set to take effect January 1, 2018. More ›

Uncle Sam Wants You . . . To Tell Him a Little About Overtime

Under a 2016 Final Rule, the Department of Labor (DOL), under the Obama administration, pushed federal regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) that would have more than doubled the “threshold” under which nearly every salaried employee would be entitled to overtime. In November 2016, a federal district court prevented the new threshold from coming into effect, and the subsequent election of President Trump called into doubt whether revised rules would ever be implemented. More ›

Dear Employers, Familiarize Yourself with OSHA's Electronic Injury Tracking Application Before December 1, 2017

As reported by the Employment Law Observer in June, OSHA has formally proposed to delay the July 1, 2017 deadline for electronic injury and illness reporting to December 1, 2017. Since announcing the delay, OSHA formally launched the Injury Tracking Application (ITA), which will serve as the secure website covered employers will use to electronically report mandatory injury and illness information. This was the missing piece preventing the July 1, 2017 deadline from taking effect, as OSHA had not set up the portal in advance of the original deadline.  More ›

California Adds New Notice Requirement for Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking Victims

Employers, another notice provision has taken effect in California. Beginning on July 1, 2017, employers with at least 25 employees must now provide written notice to new employees that explain the rights of victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. More specifically, the required notice mandates employers notify new employees of their rights under Labor Code Sections 230 and 230.1. These sections detail the following points: More ›

Hold the Mayo: Jimmy John's Workers' Disparaging Statements Not Protected by the NLRA Says 8th Circuit

How far can employees go during a labor dispute to make their case to the public? For years the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has granted employees a surprising amount of leeway, so long as their statements were not made with malicious intent and pertained to an ongoing labor dispute. In other words, employees could go quite far. Fortunately for employers, the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals recently tamped down this enthusiasm and redirected the NLRB to long-standing Supreme Court precedent. More ›

Implement a Waiting Period for Paid Vacation in California? Yes You Can.

California employers know they must compensate any employee unused and vested vacation pay upon separation from employment. Once vacation is vested, the right to vacation pay cannot be forfeited. But what happens when vacation rights have not vested? The Court of Appeals recently decided this question in Minnick v. Automotive Creations, Inc. More ›

Baby Bump to Pregnant Employee Rights: Massachusetts Enacts Pregnant Workers Fairness Act

In another effort to take aim at disparate treatment of women in the workforce, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed into law the Massachusetts Pregnant Workers Fairness Act on July 27, 2017. The new law takes effect on April 1, 2018.

The Act requires Massachusetts employers to provide pregnant women and new mothers with “reasonable accommodations” for their pregnancies and any conditions related to their pregnancies. The new Massachusetts law expands existing protections and provides express instructions on the types of accommodations employers are required to provide.  More ›

Wisconsin Appellate Court Holds Management Policy Does Not Negate At-Will Employment Relationship

At-will employment is the default rule in Wisconsin. Employers may terminate for any reason or no reason at all.  However, that relationship can be overridden by contract, in some cases inadvertently, through employee policies and other post-employment agreements. In a case that came as good news for employers, last week, the Wisconsin Court of Appeals affirmed that it would not read a policy as overriding the employment at-will relationship unless the policy evidenced an intent to do so. More ›

New Form I-9 Released: Ensure You Are In Compliance By September 18th

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services ("USCIS") published the newest version of the Form I-9 on July 17. The new Form I-9 replaces the version previously released on November 14, 2016. While the changes to the form are subtle, the consequences for employers who do not use the new form to verify the employment eligibility of all new employees by September 18 are anything but. Fines for omissions or mistakes on Form I-9 can range from $216 to $2,156 per form. More ›