Photo of Employment Law Observer Jason S. Greenfield
Associate
jgreenfield@hinshawlaw.com
212-655-3812
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Jason Greenfield handles all phases of litigation. He represents his clients in employment law matters involving discrimination and harassment, as …

Showing 8 posts by Jason S. Greenfield.

New York State Employers Must Provide Digital Copies Of Workplace Posters

On December 16, 2022, Governor Kathy Hochul signed into law an amendment to Section 201 of the New York Labor Law. Previously, Section 201 had required that employers post certain rules and orders furnished by the Commissioner of Labor of the State of New York in conspicuous places on each floor of the employer’s premises. More ›

New York Adopts New Workplace Nursing Mothers’ Law

On December 9, 2022, Governor Kathy Hochul signed into law a new workplace lactation bill, set to go into effect on June 7, 2023. The law, which amends Section 206-c of the New York Labor Law, requires that an employer provide reasonable unpaid break time, or allow for the use of paid break or meal time, each time an employee has a reasonable need to express breast milk, for up to three years following childbirth. The law further states that upon employee request, an employer is obligated to provide a location for expressing breast milk. The designated location must contain a chair, a working surface, and an electrical outlet. Additionally, the location must be in close proximity to the employee's work area, near clean running water, with lighting, shielded from view, and free from intrusion by other people. The designated location cannot be in a restroom or toilet stall. Furthermore, if the workplace has access to refrigeration, the employer must allow for the storage of expressed milk. More ›

Westchester County in New York Passes Wage Transparency Law

A local Law amending Westchester County's Human Rights Law  will go into effect on November 6, 2022. The new Law prohibits an employer (any person with at least four employees), labor organization, employment agency, or licensing agency from posting a job, promotion, or transfer opportunity without stating the minimum and maximum salary for such position. The provided salary range may extend from the lowest to the highest salary that the employer believes in good faith, at the time of posting, would pay for the advertised job opportunity. More ›

New York City to End Its Private Sector COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate

On September 20, 2022, Mayor Eric Adams announced that New York City will end its COVID-19 vaccination mandate for private sector employees, effective November 1, 2022. Since December 27, 2021, private and public employees working in New York City were required to provide their employer with “proof of vaccination” before entering the workplace—subject to an employee’s approved religious or medical accommodation. Employees who did not provide their employer with proof of vaccination were prohibited from entering the workplace, with very limited exceptions. More ›

Amendment to New York State Human Rights Law Establishes Toll-Free Confidential Hotline For Workplace Sexual Harassment Complaints

An amendment to the New York State Human Rights Law is set to go into effect on July 14, 2022. The new law directs the New York State Division of Human Rights (Division) to operate a toll-free confidential hotline, during regular business hours, which will provide counsel and assistance to individuals with complaints of workplace sexual harassment. The Division is required to recruit attorneys who have experience in handling sexual harassment matters to provide advice and legal services—on a pro-bono basis—to hotline callers. It should be noted, that participating attorneys are prohibited from soliciting or permitting their employees to solicit on the attorney’s behalf, “further representation of any individuals they advise through the hotline relating to discussed sexual harassment complaint.” More ›

New York City Salary Transparency Law Receives Clarification and Subsequent Amendment

The pending Salary Transparency Law (the Law)—which requires New York City employers to disclose the minimum and maximum salary when posting an advertisement for a job, promotion, or transfer opportunity—was  further clarified by the New York City Commission on Human Rights and subsequently amended by the New York City Council. More ›

New Amendment to New York Civil Rights Law Requires Employers to Provide Notice to Employees of Electronic Monitoring

A previously enacted amendment to the New York Civil Rights Law, effective May 7, 2022, requires employers to provide written or electronic notice to newly hired employees if the employer intends to monitor or intercept telephone conversations, email, or internet access or usage. The amendment also requires employers to obtain an employee's written or electronic acknowledgment before monitoring them. In addition, the employer must post notice of the electronic monitoring in a "conspicuous place," which is readily accessible to the employees who are subject to electronic monitoring to view. More ›

New York City Employers Now Required to Disclose Salary Range When Posting a Job Listing

On December 15, 2021, the New York City Council approved a bill amending the New York City Human Rights Law, transforming how employers advertise a job listing. Mayor Eric Adams chose not to veto the legislation before the January 14, 2022 deadline, therefore the new law is set to become effective on May 14, 2022. More ›