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Showing 2 posts in California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement.

Hinshaw's 12 Days of California Labor & Employment Series – Day 5: New Successor Liability for Wage and Hour Judgements

In the spirit of the season—and keeping some semblance of normal—we are using our annual "12 days of the holidays" blog series to address new California laws and their impact on California employers. On this fifth day of the holidays, my labor and employment attorney gave to me: five golden rings and AB 3075.

Existing law requires a corporation and foreign corporation, limited liability company, or foreign limited liability company registered to transact intrastate business to file specified documents disclosing information regarding entity with the Secretary of State, including a statement of information. This contains information regarding the general type of business that constitutes the principal business activity of the corporation or limited liability company. There are currently nine specific items a business must provide. Under AB 3075, the statement of information must also indicate whether any officer or any director—or, in the case of a limited liability company, any member or any manager—has an outstanding final judgment issued by the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE) or a court of law for the violation of any wage order or provision of the Labor Code. More ›

Hinshaw's 12 Days of California Labor & Employment Series – Day 2: Longer Time to File With the DLSE Is Another Unwanted Gift for Employers

In the spirit of the season—and keeping some semblance of normal—we are using our annual "12 days of the holidays" blog series to address new California laws and their impact on California employers. On this second day of the holidays, my labor and employment attorney gave to me: two turtle doves and AB 1947.

This bill was likely created and signed in part due to COVID-19, as it extends some deadlines. With all the craziness 2020 has brought—including work from home, court closures, court delays, and the like—it comes as no a surprise to see deadlines being extended, too. More ›