Menu

Hinshaw's 12 Days of California Labor & Employment Series – Day 4: No-Rehire Provision Now Includes One More Exception

In the spirit of the season—and keeping some semblance of normal—we are using our annual "12 days of the holidays" blog series to address new California laws and their impact on California employers. On this fourth day of the holidays, my labor and employment attorney gave to me: four calling birds and AB 2143.

No-rehire provisions were banned in employment settlement agreements as of January 1, 2020, per SB 749. There was one exception, though: if the employer made a good faith determination that the employee engaged in sexual harassment or sexual assault. If that was documented, a no-rehire provision was allowed. While this exception was helpful, SB 749 caused employer frustration throughout 2020 because it lacks other exceptions. For instance, an employer may settle employment claims, complaints or actions against them, but they are unable to include a no-rehire provision with the employee who initiated the claim. It also did not protect employers from a bad faith claim. Enter AB 2143. More ›

Hinshaw's 12 Days of California Labor & Employment Series – Day 3: Racial and Ethnic Diversity at the Forefront for California-Based Publicly Held Corporations

In the spirit of the season—and keeping some semblance of normal—we are using our annual "12 days of the holidays" blog series to address new California laws and their impact on California employers. On this third day of the holidays, my labor and employment attorney gave to me: three French hens and AB 979.

This bill is reminiscent of one we kicked off our annual series with back in 2018, which came in the wake of the #MeToo movement. The bill, SB 826, required any publicly held corporation with its principal office located in California, to include at least one woman director on the corporation's Board of Directors by the end of 2019. It further provided that, by the end of 2021, corporations with five or more directors must include at least two female board members, and corporations with six or more directors must include at least three female board members. While SB 826 addressed gender equality, AB 979 focuses on racial and ethnic diversity. More ›

Hinshaw's 12 Days of California Labor & Employment Series – Day 2: Longer Time to File With the DLSE Is Another Unwanted Gift for Employers

In the spirit of the season—and keeping some semblance of normal—we are using our annual "12 days of the holidays" blog series to address new California laws and their impact on California employers. On this second day of the holidays, my labor and employment attorney gave to me: two turtle doves and AB 1947.

This bill was likely created and signed in part due to COVID-19, as it extends some deadlines. With all the craziness 2020 has brought—including work from home, court closures, court delays, and the like—it comes as no a surprise to see deadlines being extended, too. More ›

Hinshaw's 12 Days of California Labor & Employment Series – Day 1: COVID-19 and the Rebuttable Workers' Compensation Presumption

Can you believe this year is nearly over? Before popping the champagne, it's time to reprise our annual review of key labor and employment law developments in California. While California employers are thrown curve balls every year, the events of 2020 are simply unrivaled in living memory. Employers have been in a constant state of change all year, as they have been operating at the mercy of COVID-19 case numbers, stay at home orders, capacity limitations, and so much more. In the spirit of the season—and some semblance of normal—here is the first of our annual "12 days of the holidays" blog series. On this first day of the holidays, my labor and employment attorney gave to me: a partridge in a pear tree and SB 1159. More ›

OSHA Updates its Employer Guidance on COVID-19-Related Fatality Reporting

On September 30, 2020, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) updated its answers to frequently asked questions regarding an employer's obligation to report a COVID-19-related fatality if it occurs within 30 days of the work-related incident. Notably, according to OSHA, an "incident" includes exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace. In order for a fatality to be reportable it must occur within 30 days of the exposure at work, and an employer must report the fatality to OSHA within eight hours. The time clock for the reporting obligation commences within eight hours of the employer knowing that the employee has died and that the cause of death was work-related. More ›

NLRB Weighs in on the Issue of Employer Neutrality Agreements and Section 7 Rights

The National Labor Relations Board (Board) issued a Guidance Memorandum (Guidance) on September 4, 2020, addressing the analysis of employer assistance in union organizing efforts. The Guidance has been provided as a response to requests from regional directors on a series of issues relating to the "amount of lawful support an employer can provide to a union that is attempting to organize its employees." More ›

DOL Proposes New Regulations for Determining Independent Contractor Status under FLSA

Last week, the Department of Labor (DOL) proposed new regulations designed to make it easier for companies to determine whether workers can be classified as independent contractors. The DOL proposed an "economic reality" test to determine whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). More ›

Political and Social Activism Surges in the Workplace: Five Issues for Employers to Consider

Six months into a global pandemic, employers across the United States continue to confront a series of new economic realities. One particular phenomenon employers are having to deal with is a surge of political and social activism in the workplace. Individuals across the country are voicing opinions in what can only be described as a highly polarized political environment. Many employees are expressing their viewpoints both on social media and in the workplace, and it is unreasonable to expect these conversations will not happen during working hours. More ›

DOL Clarifies Scope of Fluctuating Workweek Overtime Pay Calculation

By definition, the hallmark of the fluctuating workweek (FWW) is that the hours fluctuate. Now, following another opinion letter from the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) on the topic, employers know that this does not mean fluctuating below 40 hours per week.

The DOL was asked to weigh-in on whether an employee's time had to dip below 40 hours in order to qualify for the FWW method of calculating overtime pay. In answering the inquiry, the DOL asserted that there is nothing in the language of the regulation that requires weekly hours to vary both above and below the 40-hour threshold. More ›

DOL Temporary Rule Clarifies Paid Leave Under Families First Coronavirus Response Act

The U.S. Department of Labor issued a Temporary Rule on September 11, 2020, which revises regulations concerning paid sick leave and expanded family medical leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The rule, which goes into effect on September 16, 2020, was issued in response to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York's decision in State of New York v. Department of Labor on August 3, 2020, which struck down portions of the FFCRA regulations. More ›

Search
Subscribe via Email